Archive for January, 2012


DCMX Reminder: “if they are telling us about it in the mainstream media, they’ve had it for 15 years, at least.”

Pentagon-supported physicists on Wednesday said they had devised a “time cloak” that briefly makes an event undetectable.

The laboratory device manipulates the flow of light in such a way that for the merest fraction of a second an event cannot be seen, according to a paper published in the science journal Nature.

It adds to experimental work in creating next-generation camouflage – a so-called invisibility cloak in which specific colours cannot be perceived by the human eye.

“Our results represent a significant step towards obtaining a complete spatio-temporal cloaking device,” says the study, headed by Moti Fridman of Cornell University in New York.

The breakthrough exploits the fact that frequencies of light move at fractionally different speeds.

The so-called temporal cloak starts with a beam of green light that is passed down a fibre-optic cable.

The beam goes through a two-way lens that splits it into two frequencies – blueish light which travels relatively fast, and reddish light, which is slower.

The tiny difference in speed is then accentuated by placing a transparent obstacle in front of the two beams.                                                                  Continue reading

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Fairness: Dominant wolves learn from a young age to play down their strength

Until recently it was thought that only humans had the ability to experience complex thought and emotions. However in recent years it has been uncovered by ecologists that animals do have a sense of morality and can tell right from wrong. Animals from mice to wolves are all governed by very similar codes of conduct such as are humans.

Professor Marc Bekoff, from the University of Colorado in Boulder, Co. believes that morals are ‘hard-wired’ into the brains of all mammals. According to him,” morals provide the ‘social glue’ that allow often aggressive and competitive animals to live together in groups”. He admits however that moral codes are species specific and can be difficult to compare with each other or with humans.

Professor Bekoff is hopeful that his conclusions will help to provide more ammunition for animal welfare groups who have been working hard to have all creatures treated more humanely. He has written a book called “Wild Justice” that chronicles cases of animals acting towards each other in a very empathetic manner. Continue reading